News

Friday, 13 January, 2017

A Soil Biology Special Interest Group is being established by the Association of Applied Biologists to promote and coordinate study and understanding of soil life and the fundamental role it plays in delivering the functions that keep us all alive. Many of BMIG's species, such as geophilid centipedes and trichoniscid woodlice are important components of the soil fauna.

The group will be officially launched at a one-day conference “Advances in Soil Biology” at Rothamsted Research, on 20th April 2017. People wishing to present a poster or oral presentation are invited to submit an abstract by 27th January 2017.

For more information see: http://www.aab.org.uk/contentok.php…

AAB - President

Friday, 20 November, 2015

Thumbnail image of publication cover.An up to date review of the conservation status of centipedes, millipedes and woodlice has been published by Natural England.

A review of the Diplopoda, Chilopoda and Isopoda of Great Britain assesses the conservation status of centipedes, millipedes, woodlice and waterlice and identifies the species found in the UK that are considered to be ‘vulnerable’, ‘endangered’ or ‘critically endangered’. It also officially assigns Nationally Rare and Nationally Scarce status to species for the first time.

Despite their small size, millipedes and woodlice are the heroes of the British countryside, and especially our woodlands, where they provide an essential ecosystem service in helping with the decomposition of plant material.

These groups of minibeasts are highly sensitive to their environment and are regarded as excellent indicators of the health of the natural environment.

A copy of the review can be downloaded here.  

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Tuesday, 20 October, 2015

Christian Owen has found another species of millipede new to Britain. For some execellent images see BMIG's Facebook page.  It's identity is currently unknown, but it is rather like a large Brachychaeteuma melanops, with long stout setae and well developed paranota.  Now we just have to work out what it is!

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Saturday, 18 April, 2015

Three new genera of Craspedosomatid millipede (out of seven found) and nine new species (out of ten found) were collected during David Bilton' s and BMIG's excursions to Galicia, NW Spain, in 1993 and 2004 respectively.

The new species include Galicisoma n.g. desmondkimei n.sp.; Galicisoma n.g. biltoni n.sp. and Turdulisoma helenreadae n.sp., which are named in honour of some of those prolific BMIG members who participated.

Reference: Jean-Paul Mauriès (2015) Bull. Soc. Hist. Nat. Toulouse, 150, 2014, 27-57.

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Wednesday, 12 November, 2014

Two (yes, TWO!) species of chourdeumatid millipede new to Britain, Ceratosphys amoena ssp. confusa (Ribaut, 1955) and Hylebainosoma nontronensis Mauriès & Kime, 1999, have been recently found outdoors in south Wales - ON THE SAME DAY!

An account their discovery can be read at: http://markgtelfer.co.uk/2014/11/12/into-the-valley-of-the-millipedes-part-2/  The account includes montage images of both species, and a video of C. amoena ssp. confusa   

Additional images of both species can be seen on BMIG's facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1563158487261361.1073741833.15...

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1563394423904434.1073741834.1518319605078583&type=1

Both are similar in appearence to Craspedesoma rawlinsii. 

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